Jeff Manship

The Manship Has Docked

In this crazy world where we have maggots on sandwiches and sharks on the N train, we desperately need things that we can count on. On Thursday, I counted on being at the final game of a Rockies series that turned into a cluster-disaster since it happened in 2011 and 2012.

Luckily for me, Greg Prince's good karma trumped my loser karma as he was present at Citi for the first two wins against the Rockies and decided to go for the sweep with me, in pure Beer Money style. No, he didn't win $130, but he won something much more valuable: a Mets sweep. Thursday had all the earmarks of that cluster-disaster I referenced. Getaway day against a team that had lost their starting pitcher late Wednesday night and countered with some guy named Jeff Manship … and was resting Troy Tulowitzki. And when Corey Dickerson hit an absolute bomb off Dillon Gee in the fourth, the steps seemed to be ordered for another horrible loss.

But the Mets got two back in the fourth on a groundout by Wilmer Flores where we learned first hand just how slow Flores is, and a sac fly by Anthony Recker. It was the only blemish for Gee through seven and 2/3's innings, the bullpen took it from there and the Mets unexpectedly finished the job on the Rockies. Of course, it might have been a little more comfortable if Ike Davis wasn't daydreaming about puppies and rainbows at third base after he got caught off on a Dillon Gee grounder to second base. Let me stress this: He was caught off third base on a throw from the other side of second. Again, another earmark of a horrible Mets loss only to have it surprisingly turn into a victory. I just hope that there is a sports talk radio guy in Denver that used the term "NEEEEEEEE STINK!" regarding the Denver Nine after the game.

(Two plays that shouldn't be ignored are the double play Chris Dickerson flew into in the first after Gee was in trouble after letting the first two guys on, and Scott Rice's four pitch walk in the eighth. Why D.J. LeMahieu tried to tag from first to second I'll never know, but give Marlon Byrd credit for being heads up and making a good throw. Also, you might have thought Scott Rice's only four pitches of the game were quite useless. But his walk of pinch hitter Tulowitzki, which might have been an unintentional-intentional, turned out to be the best thing to happen as David Aardsma was brought in after that to face Michael Cuddyer and got the third out of the inning … albeit not without some helter skelter after two more balls.)

The one thing that I'll remember this game for, besides being sick as a dog for a good portion of it, was the variety and randomness of teams represented in the stands by various apparel. There was a guy in a Bronson Arroyo jersey complete with Reds hat. There was a second guy in a Daniel Nava Red Sox shirsey. But then the most bizarre one of all noticed on the way out: A San Francisco Giants jersey, complete with the gold "World Champions" trimming, with the name and number "DIETZ 2" on the back. Dick Dietz played for the Giants and indeed wore number 2 from 1966-1971. (He was also the guy who got hit by a Don Drysdale pitch during his scoreless streak but was not awarded first base because he didn't try to get out of the way.)

But yeah. A Dick Dietz jersey at Citi Field. I responded to that the best way I knew how: I went home and chugged NyQuil. And nothing I saw in my drug induced sleep was as bizarre as seeing a Dick Dietz jersey at Citi Field.

The Mets are now on their west coast swing … a daunting ten game roadie against Arizona, Los Angeles, and San Diego (eleven if you count the make-up game tacked on at the end in Minnesota, which I clearly didn't). And it starts with some foreshadowing:

Yup. This is the world we live in. Maggots on sandwiches, sharks on the N train, and no David Wright to save us. Humanity is doomed.

Metstradamus

About Metstradamus

I've been a Mets fan since 1976. The 1988 NLCS still bothers me infinitely more than it should. Keep reaching for the stars, and then get checked for a torn ligament.

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